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 Post subject: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Tue 01 May 2012 5:08 pm 
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Can someone help me with either a euphemism, colloquialism or Irish translation for "quickly", like "pish posh" or "on the double"

The context is a mother is asking her kids to get dressed "quickly".

excerpt -
"Kevin I want you and your sister to take a bath, then get dressed in your good clothes. Please do it quickly!"

Thanks for any help you can provide!

SEAN LOUIS TRACI


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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Tue 01 May 2012 5:40 pm 
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There are many words for quickly: go tapa, go tapaidh, go gasta, go scioptha, go mear

Déan go beo é le do thoil (when addressed to one person).


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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Tue 01 May 2012 5:43 pm 
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Scooby's suggestions are good ones.


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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Wed 02 May 2012 2:38 pm 
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Location: St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Scooby wrote:
There are many words for quickly: go tapa, go tapaidh, go gasta, go scioptha, go mear

Déan go beo é le do thoil (when addressed to one person).


Why so many ways to say "quickly"? Are these all adverbs? I'm trying to think of this many in English and all I can think of besides quickly is "hurry" which isn't even an adverb.

Edit: Okay, so the thesaurus entry for "quickly" gives me several more, but none of them are really used in modern everyday American English speech when trying to hurry someone along. I've said, "Quick quick like a bunny!" to my kids but I have no idea why or where that even comes from.

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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Wed 02 May 2012 3:49 pm 
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Maybe the Irish are less patient? :LOL: I use yet another way to say it: Dean deifir. But English also has many ways. Make it snappy, get a move on, get the lead out are just a few.


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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Wed 02 May 2012 3:56 pm 
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Yup. Hurry up, get a move on, move, move it, shift it, hustle, look lively, step lively, stat, etc., etc.

And if you're just looking for synonyms, without giving it the character of an order, there are even more: rapidly, briskly, swiftly, promptly, with alacrity, etc.

Redwolf


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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Wed 02 May 2012 4:27 pm 
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Yeah, but all those (aside from "hurry", "move", and "hustle") are more like idioms than words or orders. We do have synonyms, but I'd never say any of those to my kids when they're stalling in the morning. Maybe I should. "Dad's already in the car! Wipe up those crumbs and put on your shoes! Briskly!" :yes:

So I'd say either the Irish are impatient (LOL), or their children stall more often than mine, which I'm pretty sure is impossible (but our ancestry might explain it).

Could someone please give the pronunciations for some of these (go tapa, go tapaidh, go gasta, go scioptha, go mear, and dean deifir)? I can't find any of them on forvo.com :(

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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Wed 02 May 2012 5:10 pm 
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Shure if yer going with déan deifir you might as well add in brostaigh ort, ná déan moill, ná bí ag tarraingt na gcos, déan deabhadh (?), bíodh fuadar fút - although I don't know if anyone would actually say the last two.


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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Wed 02 May 2012 7:36 pm 
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mimerim wrote:
Are these all adverbs? I'm trying to think of this many in English and all I can think of besides quickly is "hurry" which isn't even an adverb.


The word "go" makes them adverbs. Without "go," they are nouns or adjectives.

Tapa = quickness (noun)
Go tapa = quickly (adverb)

Beo = alive (adjective)
Go beo = lively (adverb)

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 Post subject: Re: Irish for Quickly
PostPosted: Wed 02 May 2012 8:26 pm 
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Scooby wrote:
Shure if yer going with déan deifir you might as well add in brostaigh ort, ná déan moill, ná bí ag tarraingt na gcos, déan deabhadh (?), bíodh fuadar fút - although I don't know if anyone would actually say the last two.

Déan deabhadh is good. It's probably worth nothing that in Munster, people used "deifir" to mean difference and "deabhadh" to mean hurry.

I've read the word spelled sciobtha Dialectal? Spelling variation?


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