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 Post subject: An expression
PostPosted: Tue 26 Jun 2012 6:51 pm 
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Location: 91 - France
I'm always wary of expressions that I find which seem to come directly from English and that could be described as Béarlachas. What do you think of this one? Something's afoot (meaning that it's not good) - which I've found as Gaeilge - tá rud éigin ar cois. Do Irish-speakers really say this?


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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Tue 26 Jun 2012 7:40 pm 
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franc 91 wrote:
I'm always wary of expressions that I find which seem to come directly from English and that could be described as Béarlachas. What do you think of this one? Something's afoot (meaning that it's not good) - which I've found as Gaeilge - tá rud éigin ar cois. Do Irish-speakers really say this?



Personally I've never heard that expression before.

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It is recommended that you always wait for three to agree on a translation.
I speak Connemara Irish, and my input will often reflect that.
I will do an mp3 file on request for short translations.

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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Tue 26 Jun 2012 8:13 pm 
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Bríd Mhór wrote:
franc 91 wrote:
I'm always wary of expressions that I find which seem to come directly from English and that could be described as Béarlachas. What do you think of this one? Something's afoot (meaning that it's not good) - which I've found as Gaeilge - tá rud éigin ar cois. Do Irish-speakers really say this?



Personally I've never heard that expression before.

Neither have I.


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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Tue 26 Jun 2012 8:20 pm 
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franc 91 wrote:
I'm always wary of expressions that I find which seem to come directly from English and that could be described as Béarlachas.
One of my biggest difficulties is knowing what is and isn't Béarlachas :S One of my many difficulties.... :mrgreen:

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
Beatha teanga í a labhairt.


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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Tue 26 Jun 2012 9:09 pm 
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Location: 91 - France
GRMA go léir - tout le monde - (perhaps I should create a corner of dreaded Béarlachas that we can all steer clear off) it reminds me of the Latin we used to invent at school - Quid super nunc (ie what's up now) - is that the road I see rising before me? (and there are all the too literal translations from Irish to English, that also get in the way - níl clú agam!)


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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Tue 26 Jun 2012 11:15 pm 
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Location: Navasota, Texas USA
Our favorites back in parochial school were:

" Semper ubi sub ubi" - Always wear underwear and,

"Ascende tui" - up yours

One of my inventions i nGaeilge is:

Sin go fionnuar - That's really cool! (at least I think I made it up)

Cé a fhios aige? Who knows?

Sorry....just having a little craic.


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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Wed 27 Jun 2012 1:07 am 
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If it is Béarlachas, it is not recent (besides "afoot" has pretty much gone out of use in English nowadays anyway. :rolleyes: )

ar cois is in FGB, under cos sense 13

It (or ar chois) also appears in that sense in some Irish literary works:

Quote:
Ba mhór an méid smuglaereachta a bhí ar chois san iarthar
an tráth sin agus d'fhóir cuanta agus clúideanna Acla go
maith do na smuglaeirí.

(Séamus Mag Uidhir "Fánaidheacht i gConndae Mhuigheo")

Séamus 'ac Grianna appears to have used it extensively:

Quote:
Ach ba ghoirid gur tuigeadh go gcaithfeadh sé go rabh rud
inteacht ar cois.
("Mo Dhá Róisín")

Bhí na páistí uilig agus a súile sáithte i Séimidh aca,
agus íongantas an dómhain ar Shéimidh bhocht goidé bhí ar
cois.
("Caisleáin Óir")

D'aithín Tarlach Mór goidé bhí ar cois acht níor labhair
sé.
("Thiar i dTír Chonaill")

...

(Source: Tobar na Gaeidhilge)

So even if it _were_ Béarlachas and you did use it, you'd still be in good company. ;)

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Wed 27 Jun 2012 3:21 am 
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And the favorite Latin phrase at my school: Ubi oh ubi est meus sububi - where oh where is my underwhere. Bad Latin, bad English.


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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Wed 27 Jun 2012 4:34 pm 
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Posts: 572
beagle wrote:
And the favorite Latin phrase at my school: Ubi oh ubi est meus sububi - where oh where is my underwhere. Bad Latin, bad English.

:darklaugh:


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 Post subject: Re: An expression
PostPosted: Wed 27 Jun 2012 4:35 pm 
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Joined: Tue 06 Sep 2011 8:09 pm
Posts: 572
Breandán wrote:
If it is Béarlachas, it is not recent (besides "afoot" has pretty much gone out of use in English nowadays anyway. :rolleyes: )

ar cois is in FGB, under cos sense 13

It (or ar chois) also appears in that sense in some Irish literary works:

Quote:
Ba mhór an méid smuglaereachta a bhí ar chois san iarthar
an tráth sin agus d'fhóir cuanta agus clúideanna Acla go
maith do na smuglaeirí.

(Séamus Mag Uidhir "Fánaidheacht i gConndae Mhuigheo")

Séamus 'ac Grianna appears to have used it extensively:

Quote:
Ach ba ghoirid gur tuigeadh go gcaithfeadh sé go rabh rud
inteacht ar cois.
("Mo Dhá Róisín")

Bhí na páistí uilig agus a súile sáithte i Séimidh aca,
agus íongantas an dómhain ar Shéimidh bhocht goidé bhí ar
cois.
("Caisleáin Óir")

D'aithín Tarlach Mór goidé bhí ar cois acht níor labhair
sé.
("Thiar i dTír Chonaill")

...

(Source: Tobar na Gaeidhilge)

So even if it _were_ Béarlachas and you did use it, you'd still be in good company. ;)


GRMA

I hadn't realised that "afoot" had gone out use? It seems reasonable common around here. Certainly not disused.


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