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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 3:32 pm 
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The context is that I am trying to guess something in a child's game. After a while, I have had enough and 'I give up'.
'Tugaim suas' sounds like Béarlachas; is it?

There are other options eg. eirím as? (to give up smoking = éirí as na toitíní: I'm not sure if this is the same thing?)
'géillim' seems to be another option?

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 3:46 pm 
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How about the verb géill?


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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 3:47 pm 
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franc 91 wrote:
How about the verb géill?

That was the last of the options I gave above. Are you saying that is the best one to use? Is 'tugaim suas' Béarlachas? I do not like the sound of 'tugaim suas', but that doesn't mean it is wrong!

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 3:49 pm 
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Well if you look at Pota Focal, it is used for that.


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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 3:52 pm 
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Grma. The original question still stands: Is 'tugaim suas' Béárlachas? I may well use 'géillim' as seo amach, but am now curious about 'tugaim suas' which I have never used, but have heard several times.

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 4:04 pm 
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Quote:
Well if you look at Pota Focal, it is used for that.


it doesn't mean it's not a Béarlachas!

Yes, it is a Béarlachas. "Tugaim suas" in irish would mean you're giving something to someone that is in a higher place than you, I guess "to give something+up(wards)".

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 4:09 pm 
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Lughaidh wrote:
Quote:
Well if you look at Pota Focal, it is used for that.


it doesn't mean it's not a Béarlachas!

Yes, it is a Béarlachas. "Tugaim suas" in irish would mean you're giving something to someone that is in a higher place than you, I guess "to give something+up(wards)".


I agree. A fair amount of Béarlachas seems to make its way into some of these things. I would use "géillim."

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 5:42 pm 
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I would consider 'tugaim suas' to be outrageous Béarlachas. Do people actually say this in the Gaeltacht? In a way I wouldn't be surprised if they did. The tentacles of Béarla stretch far, and in the case of a community who at least hear (if not speak) English every day, why wouldn't English affect their Irish?

My question, therefore, is to what extent can we continue to hold that Gaeltacht Irish is where we should look to in order to ascertain what is correct and what is incorrect in the language. What happens if/when 'living' spoken Irish becomes Béarla in disguise?

It worries me a bit when I hear about grammar rules being simplified because 'nobody bothers with the Uimhir Dhé or even the Tuiseal Ginideach (in certain circumstances)' any more. Languages change, and this marks them out as being living languages...but in the case of Irish there is a real danger that it will become watered down to the point of non-existence by one dominant language - English.

Just one other example - the current Leaving Cert has a picture series that students must describe for the Oral Irish exam. It's about students visiting the Gaeltacht. In the last picture, when they are leaving, there's a speech bubble beside one young person saying 'Téacs mé'. Sure, young people might say that in the Gaeltacht - but I hope they don't!


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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 7:14 pm 
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Scooby wrote:
Just one other example - the current Leaving Cert has a picture series that students must describe for the Oral Irish exam. It's about students visiting the Gaeltacht. In the last picture, when they are leaving, there's a speech bubble beside one young person saying 'Téacs mé'.

8O 8O

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PostPosted: Thu 12 Apr 2012 7:31 pm 
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Interestingly, de Bhaldraithe gives tugaim suas (dún) for "surrender (a fort)" and for surrendering oneself or one's arms to the authorities. But that's about as close as tugaim suas gets I would say. Not really relevant to the context of exiting a game.

The following are from the West Connemara Gaeltacht:

Tabhair suas do chás "to give up (the ghost). "
Thug mé mo chás suas ar maidin inniu I gave up completely (on him) this morning.
Tá a chás tugthaí suas aige "he has given up" (of terminally ill man).
Bhí curtha suas lena bhás aige. "He had given up" "He was resigned to die"

The context seems a bit more serious though - terminally so, except for the second one perhaps.

Perhaps ligim uaim é "I give (it) up, I relinquish it", "it" here being the game, your turn, your right, etc.

Another option might be Tá mé réidh leis "I have had enough of it".

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My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
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Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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