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PostPosted: Mon 09 Jul 2012 10:58 pm 
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There's no reason to limit a song to a particular dialect, regardless of where it comes from. Heck, I sing Éamonn a' Cnoic with Ulster pronunciation...the dialect police haven't come after me yet. It is a living language, after all.

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Tue 10 Jul 2012 12:01 am 
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I've not disputed it... I just said Mhwombat's transcription didn't correspond to an Ulster pronunciation, which is normal since Méav in the video pronounces more or less as in Munster.
But singers may adapt songs in their dialect if they want, no problem (and most do, at least in pronunciation).

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Is fearr Gaeilg na Gaeltaċta ná Gaeilg ar biṫ eile
Agus is í Gaeilg Ġaoṫ Doḃair is binne
:)


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PostPosted: Tue 17 Jul 2012 5:15 am 
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I just had a heart attack when I saw this post, because I was contemplating asking a question about this song...So, here goes:

What's a dulaman??

Pure and simple. :S Ahaha


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PostPosted: Tue 17 Jul 2012 9:50 am 
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Here are the lyrics in Irish and translated into English
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clann ... n_song.htm
dúlamán means a kind of seaweed, but in fact there are two men in this song who are competing for the favours of a girl and each one is given the name of the particular seaweed that they harvest.


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PostPosted: Tue 17 Jul 2012 10:59 pm 
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Thank you :) I had found the translation seaweed before, but it didnt make sense so I assumed it was wrrong. I get it now!!! :D obe last thing; whats binne mean?


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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jul 2012 6:19 am 
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Annabeth wrote:
Thank you :) I had found the translation seaweed before, but it didnt make sense so I assumed it was wrrong. I get it now!!! :D obe last thing; whats binne mean?


In this case, "cliffs."

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jul 2012 7:09 am 
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Location: 91 - France
Binne - as Redwolf has pointed out - here means cliffs, but the other meaning which implies something high up, is the gable of a house or cottage. It also can mean lovely.
(The next time, if you are looking for the meaning of a word, you can also look it up in Pota Focal.)


Last edited by franc 91 on Wed 18 Jul 2012 7:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jul 2012 7:47 am 
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franc 91 wrote:
(The next time, if you are looking for the meaning of a word, you can look it up in Pota Focal.)

I think Franc means you can also try looking it up in Pota Focal - but there is no harm in asking here as well. ;)

Strictly speaking, binne means "of the cliff" here. The dictionary form is binn. The declension runs:

binn (f2) "cliff"
an bhinn "the cliff"
na binne "of the cliff"
na beanna "the cliffs"
na mbeann "of the cliffs"

na binne búi = "of the yellow cliff"

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jul 2012 8:38 am 
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franc 91 wrote:
Here are the lyrics in Irish and translated into English
http://www.celticlyricscorner.net/clann ... n_song.htm
dúlamán means a kind of seaweed, but in fact there are two men in this song who are competing for the favours of a girl and each one is given the name of the particular seaweed that they harvest.



Dúlamán is the same thing as Dulse isnt it ??

Or is Dulse the english word for it .


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PostPosted: Wed 18 Jul 2012 9:34 am 
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I think dúlamán was used as a fertilizer, though I'm not sure about that. Dulse or dillisk (duileasc) as they called when we were in Donegal, is for eating. In the pub we went to the night before we caught the boat to Aran Mór, the fear a tí handed some out (just after an unfortunate incident had occurred - an old man had come in wanting someone to buy him a drink and when he realised he wasn't going to get what he wanted began swearing at everyone and was told to leave). We asked him why and he said it was to make us thirsty. He also said that local men climbed down to the base of Slieve League (Sliabh Liag) to harvest it and it was dangerous occupation. On one occasion, one of them slipped and broke his leg and another had to put him over his shoulders and carry him back up, which was a long and difficult climb.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palmaria_palmata
http://ga.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duileasc


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