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 Post subject: Grammer
PostPosted: Wed 28 Mar 2012 3:41 am 
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Joined: Fri 16 Mar 2012 6:23 pm
Posts: 36
Dia Daoibh,

Can anyone point me to the grammer rule that says there should be a "h" in the following sentences

Tá cógas á cheannach aige
Tá cógas á dhíol aici sa chógaslann
Tá leabhar á cheannach aige sa siopa leabhar.

Tá leabhar "Buntús Gramadaí" agam, ach ní fhaca me an rule seo sa leabhar.

Does anyone happen to have that book and if so can they tell me what page covers this rule??

oh, and also why there is a "g" in these ones and not a "h"..
Tá éadaí á gceannach aige
Tá glasraí á gceannach acu

and why there is nothing in this one
Tá feoil á ceannach acu

Confusing !!


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 Post subject: Re: Grammer
PostPosted: Wed 28 Mar 2012 4:17 am 
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Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 6:15 pm
Posts: 3250
Location: An Astráil
Hint:

cógas is masculine.
feoil is feminine
éadaí and glasraí are plural.

;)

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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 Post subject: Re: Grammer
PostPosted: Wed 28 Mar 2012 4:52 am 
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Joined: Fri 16 Mar 2012 6:23 pm
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how do you know if something is masculine or feminine?

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Please feel free to correct anything I say in Irish that is incorrect.
Anything in English, leave it alone, I dont care. :)


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 Post subject: Re: Grammer
PostPosted: Wed 28 Mar 2012 8:54 am 
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Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 6:15 pm
Posts: 3250
Location: An Astráil
There are hints in the spelling. -as is usually masculine.

mhwombat gives some insight here:

viewtopic.php?f=34&t=834

_________________

WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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 Post subject: Re: Grammer
PostPosted: Wed 28 Mar 2012 4:53 pm 
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Joined: Sun 28 Aug 2011 8:44 pm
Posts: 2487
Location: Santa Cruz Mountains, California, USA
There are definitely patterns, but they're much more complicated and diverse than in French or Spanish, and it's easy to get overwhelmed by trying to memorize them (and, of course, there are the exceptions to the patterns!). What seems to help me most is focusing on how masculine and feminine words inflect in relation to the words around them (knowing that feminine nouns lenite in the nominative after the definite article, for example)...then, when I hear them in a song or a sentence, I know how to treat them.

And, of course, there's always the dictionary. When you're first learning, you'll need to refer to the dictionary a lot to find out if given words are masculine or feminine.

Redwolf


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