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PostPosted: Fri 04 May 2012 2:30 pm 
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Here's me with yet another brain cramp!

Do people tend to use duit/dhuit consistently within a given dialect? For example, would a person who says "Dia dhuit" be likely to also say "seo dhuit" or "cad is ainm dhuit?" or would they default to "duit"?

I've been going back and forth trying to think of how I've heard it, but one of the problems with being exposed to many dialects (via friends, TG4, etc.) is I can't remember who said what when!

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Fri 04 May 2012 4:04 pm 
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From memory:
in Munster and Connachta, I think they have to use the dh- forms after vowels, otherwise I think they may use either the d- or the dh- (but actually I dunno if they ever use the d- forms in Connachta... Bríd? :-) ).

In Ulster, people very rarely use the dh- forms, as far as I know, except in very few set phrases like "seo dhuit" (even "sheo dhuit").

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PostPosted: Fri 04 May 2012 10:14 pm 
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Meanwhile, in school, I learned that 'Dia duit' was the correct form and 'Dia dhuit' was wrong........ :/ We learned that you pronounce the 'h', but do not write it.

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PostPosted: Fri 04 May 2012 10:48 pm 
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Saoirse wrote:
Meanwhile, in school, I learned that 'Dia duit' was the correct form and 'Dia dhuit' was wrong........ :/ We learned that you pronounce the 'h', but do not write it.

I think you mean the correct spelling, don't you?

I was taught that although it was written "Dia duit" officially, only school learners said it that way. :winkgrin:

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Fri 04 May 2012 11:06 pm 
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I'm more concerned with pronunciation consistency within a given dialect (and any rules...or just pretty good guidelines...there may be).

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PostPosted: Fri 04 May 2012 11:13 pm 
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Edited, cf below

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Last edited by Lughaidh on Fri 04 May 2012 11:19 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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PostPosted: Fri 04 May 2012 11:15 pm 
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Pretty much always dhuit in Connemara which is why Connemara speakers prefer to spell it that way.

In rapid speech, the dh is dropped altogether, to give 'om, 'uit, etc. I think the "rule" is probably dhuit after vowels; 'uit after consonants.

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WARNING: Intermediate speaker - await further opinions, corrections and adjustments before acting on my advice.
My "specialty" is Connemara Irish, particularly Cois Fhairrge dialect.
Is fearr Gaeilge ḃriste ná Béarla cliste, cinnte, aċ i ḃfad níos fearr aríst í Gaeilge ḃinn ḃeo na nGaeltaċtaí.
Gaeilge Chonnacht (GC), go háraid Gaeilge Chois Fhairrge (GCF), agus Gaeilge an Chaighdeáin Oifigiúil (CO).


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PostPosted: Fri 04 May 2012 11:20 pm 
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Quote:
Meanwhile, in school, I learned that 'Dia duit' was the correct form and 'Dia dhuit' was wrong........ :/


because your teacher was stupid (or ignorant) maybe ;)

Quote:
We learned that you pronounce the 'h', but do not write it.


like "let's speak Connachta Irish but it's absolutely forbidden to write it". How clever... I wonder why a language could be fine in speech but not fine in writing. I guess teachers are influenced by some propaganda...
But that's more or less what was told us in the university: speak in the dialect you want but stick to the standard in writing (but it was allowed to write certain dialectal forms like chífidh etc, but not many). I stuck to it in my written exams... and you see how much I stick to it now :rofl:

Quote:
I was taught that although it was written "Dia duit" officially, only school learners said it that way. :winkgrin:


that's the way you'd say it in Ulster, when you say it, like.

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Is fearr Gaeilg na Gaeltaċta ná Gaeilg ar biṫ eile
Agus is í Gaeilg Ġaoṫ Doḃair is binne
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PostPosted: Sat 05 May 2012 3:16 am 
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I never have heard "dhuit" in Ulster. It's a distinct hard "ditch" sort of sounding word, so it's something you notice right away. Granted, my Irish last summer was (and still is) pretty basic, but that's something I would have been listening for. I've heard folks sort of snicker when I say it like it's way too weird or something and I obviously don't know how to pronounce it. :hullo:


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PostPosted: Fri 18 May 2012 4:53 pm 
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Lughaidh wrote:
From memory:
in Munster and Connachta, I think they have to use the dh- forms after vowels, otherwise I think they may use either the d- or the dh- (but actually I dunno if they ever use the d- forms in Connachta... Bríd? :-) ).

In Ulster, people very rarely use the dh- forms, as far as I know, except in very few set phrases like "seo dhuit" (even "sheo dhuit").



"the dh- forms after vowels" - that sounds like the way we use it - Dia dhuit (Dia duit- would be totally wrong).
We use the dh most of the time. But sometimes we do use duit/di/dom etc - but I don't know what the rules are.

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It is recommended that you always wait for three to agree on a translation.
I speak Connemara Irish, and my input will often reflect that.
I will do an mp3 file on request for short translations.

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