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 Post subject: Meanings of "ní mór"
PostPosted: Wed 23 May 2012 8:17 pm 
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Does the meaning of "ní mór" depend on the context or is there a specific gramatical rule?
Cuir i gcás:
Ní mór an dul chun cinn a dhein(rinne) siad - they didn't make much progress but we say Ní mór dul chun cinn a dhéanamh meaning Progress must be made


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PostPosted: Thu 24 May 2012 9:57 am 
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You are correct it is all about context i.e.
Ní mór an cat a chur amach; It is necessary to put the cat out.
Ní mór den bhia a d'ith sí ; She did not eat much of the food
an alternative I use is = ní foláir One nust/It is necessary


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PostPosted: Fri 25 May 2012 2:45 am 
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FearGaelach - Thank you.
What triggered the question was that a friend-teacher of mine had written on top of an examination paper - Ni mór d'ainm a chur ar an bpáipéar . A number of students didn't comply, interpreting it as "No need to put your name on the paper. Use of "Ní foláir" would probably have not caused a problem


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PostPosted: Fri 25 May 2012 2:55 pm 
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Séamus wrote:
FearGaelach - Thank you.
What triggered the question was that a friend-teacher of mine had written on top of an examination paper - Ni mór d'ainm a chur ar an bpáipéar . A number of students didn't comply, interpreting it as "No need to put your name on the paper. Use of "Ní foláir" would probably have not caused a problem
I think the same problem would have arisen. 'Ní' is associated with negative and so anything with 'ní' is interpretated as being negative. If the phrase isn't learned early on, it takes a shift of mindset to adapt. I am speaking from personal experience on this one.... :mrgreen: In fact I still haven't fully recovered from that particular affliction :/

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Is foghlaimeoir mé. I am a learner. DEFINITELY wait for others to confirm and/or improve.
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PostPosted: Fri 25 May 2012 4:04 pm 
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Saoirse wrote:
Séamus wrote:
FearGaelach - Thank you.
What triggered the question was that a friend-teacher of mine had written on top of an examination paper - Ni mór d'ainm a chur ar an bpáipéar . A number of students didn't comply, interpreting it as "No need to put your name on the paper. Use of "Ní foláir" would probably have not caused a problem
I think the same problem would have arisen. 'Ní' is associated with negative and so anything with 'ní' is interpretated as being negative. If the phrase isn't learned early on, it takes a shift of mindset to adapt. I am speaking from personal experience on this one.... :mrgreen: In fact I still haven't fully recovered from that particular affliction :/


I struggle with this one as well.

Redwolf


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PostPosted: Sun 27 May 2012 8:23 pm 
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AnFearGaelach wrote:
You are correct it is all about context i.e.
Ní mór an cat a chur amach; It is necessary to put the cat out.
Ní mór den bhia a d'ith sí ; She did not eat much of the food
an alternative I use is = ní foláir One nust/It is necessary


The only small difference in my experience with Irish here would be:

Ní mór den bhia a d'ith sí -- sounds very odd to me!

Ní mórán den bhia a d'ith sí,
or
Níor ith sí mórán den bhia
'mórán' being a sort of 'strong' word the emphasis is there anyway.

You can also have:
Ní mór duit a bheith cúramach = You must be careful

I might suggest that probably the best way to get away from the 'negative' thing with 'ní' in the mind in this usage is to learn some samples 'off by heart' and when repeated enough, they will become natural and can be more easily applied to other situations.

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Bí cinnte de go nglacfaidh triúr le gach aistriúchán a thabharfar.
Be sure to get three in agreement with a translation given.


Last edited by Braoin on Sun 27 May 2012 9:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sun 27 May 2012 8:30 pm 
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Braoin wrote:
I might suggest that probably the best way to get away from the 'negative' thing with 'ní' in the mind in this usage is to learn some samples 'off by heart' and when repeated enough, they will become natural and can be more easily applied to other situations.
That sounds like excellent advice. I recognise good advice, I just forget to follow it sometimes.... :mrgreen:

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